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Thursday, 31 October 2019

Hemimycena

Hemimycena 

I took a stroll around my local cemetery the other day.  Beautiful sunny day and just the right damp conditions. I've mentioned before that cemeteries have really good habitat for mushrooms to flourish because they have lots of different trees and are well established.

That day I saw some perfect white mushrooms growing in pine needle litter.  Great for photographing as they were in their prime.


Showing group in pine needles



Showing fine fibres at the base of stem





Showing gills
Characteristics:

Cap up to 1.5 cm across, firstly conical then bell-shaped and can flatten.  The margin becomes wavy with maturity.  Chalk white, with a more pale/cream centre.   The gills are white and quite crowded.  Stem is white and has white fibres at the base.  No odour. Grows in large groups amongst pine needles and other debris.  Summer to Autumn.

There are several that can grow either in conifer or pine needles. Lactea, cucullata, pithya and pseudogracilis. With the absence of analysis with this I cannot determine which precisely it is.














Thursday, 24 October 2019

Hygrocybe psittacina - Parrot Waxcap

Hygrocybe psittacina - Parrot Waxcap

A simple stroll turned into something a little more special last week.  I was admiring some fungus growing in some moss on a quiet suburban street and was approached by a lovely couple who invited me to take a look in their garden at the abundance of mushrooms.
I discovered a Parrot Waxcap aptly named after the green/yellow/red colours of parrots.
It really is quite a lovely fungus and this was my first sighting.

Characteristics:

Cap up to 3 cm across, firstly convex or bell-shaped and then more flat with a broad umbo.  Also firstly, it has a greenish hue, slowly turning more yellow with a pinkish stain on or near the centre of the umbo.  The texture of the cap is waxy/greasy/gluten-like.
The gills are broad, with a yellowish staining at the edge. The stem is yellow, greenish/blue and it smells mealy.  It grows in grass on lawns or heaths - Summer to late Autumn.  Waxcaps thrive in natural habitat and are prone to being affected by fertilizers.  Therefore they are not as common as previously.

Showing cap

Showing yellow tinged gills




Thursday, 10 October 2019

Galerina marginata - Funeral Cap/Funeral Bell

Galerina marginata - Funeral Cap/Funeral Bell

As the common name indicates this mushroom is very poisonous.  It contains the same toxins as the Amanita phalloides Death Cap mushroom.  Also, it can easily be mistaken for Kuehneromyces mutabilis.

It is not rare but not so common either.  To be found on stumps and logs of broad-leaf trees.  I discovered a little group on the Clifton side of the River Trent, Nottinghamshire.  The striking feature for me is the striate and significant ring for such a delicate looking mushroom.

Characteristics: cap yellowish/tan up to 6.5 cm across.  Gelatinous, slight umbo, smooth textured. Drying more yellowish.  Gills concolorous with the cap, crowded.  Stem also concolorous with the cap but darker tan below the ring.  The stem being slender and equal and fibrous.  The ring is superior, prominent, brown, striate/fibrous.
The odour is faint, mealy.  

Showing underside and the distinctive ring

Showing the cap


It looks an innocent little mushroom, but clearly looks can be deceptive.
Thank you to Howard Williams for helping me to identify this mushroom.


Wednesday, 18 September 2019

Oudemansiella mucida - Porcelain Fungus

Oudemansiella mucida - Porcelain Fungus

I have to give credit to my son for finding this beautiful little fungus.  Whilst I was busy photographing a Russula he had spotted some huge brackets and then saw the Porcelain Fungus growing in profusion on a large dead beech tree.


Having always admired the delicate beauty of this fungus in books, it was just great to see it first-hand.  We spent a long time taking photos of this discovery at various stages from very young to mature.  Both of us captivated by it.  It is like pure white porcelain that has morphed into a fungus! And just begs to be photographed.

Characteristics:

Cap up to 8 cm across, when young grey, slowly turning white. Semi-translucent, slimy.  Looks shiny. Gills distant, pure white. Stem also white, striate above the ring which is membrane like and delicate. To be found on dead beech in clusters; sometimes large. Later Summer to Autumn.  Common.

Showing top of the cap




Showing distant gills and membrane ring
Showing a cluster with young examples

Showing cap and stem






Friday, 6 September 2019

Polyporus loptocephalus - Blackfoot Polypore

Polyporus loptocephalus - Blackfoot Polypore

Only my second sighting of this little Polypore.  The first being on a golf course in Angus Scotland several years ago.  This time it was on my own patch in Derbyshire, England!  It was growing in isolation on a broken twig lying on the ground amongst leaf litter.  The specimen in Scotland was as its maximum size which is 10 cm across.  This tiny little one was about 2 cm across but perfectly formed.  The black marking towards the base of the stem being a perfect example of why it gets its name.

Characteristics:

Cap 1-10 cm across, funnel-shaped with an irregular margin edge.  Indented at the point where the stem attaches.  Oche-brown becoming tan with age.  Finely lined.  Pores white later becoming brown. Stem approx up to 5 cm, narrow with blackening at the base.

Showing cap

Showing the black marking at the base of the stem 'Blackfoot'

Close-up of cap







Monday, 12 August 2019

Enteridium lycoperdon

Enteridium lycoperdon

Enteridium lycoperdon is a member of the Myxomycetes most usually referred to as Slime Moulds.  
The majority of these are very tiny but a few can be seen with the naked eye.  A very primative fungus and a subject in itself.

Wandering around my allotment earlier this year I came across Enteridium lycoperdon.  It was larger than previous ones I'd seen, and a week or so later it had burst releasing a mass of brown spores.  Having never seen the spores burst out I thought I'd share the photographs in this post.

Characteristics: medium to large sized whitish cushion.  Can feel rubbery and soft.
At maturity it breaks down to expose reddish brown spores.  Usually to be found on dead trees but usually the tree is still in the ground.  Can be seen throughout the year but mostly in the Spring.



Cushion-like fruit body

Reddish brown spores exposed


Monday, 8 July 2019

Peziza cerea - Cellar Cup

Peziza cerea - Cellar Cup

I received an email from a friend who notified me that he'd found a fungus growing in his garage.  Off I went later that day to take a look. It's not every day that I go to investigate a fungus growing inside a building.

Cellar Cup is often to be found on rotting sandbags, sacking, damp mortar and soil between damp paving stones.  Fundamentally this fungus likes damp and moist conditions.  I came across Cellar Cup a long time ago - that example was growing on discarded sacking.  The example included in this post was covered in cobwebs but in prime condition.

Characteristics:  Cup 1-5 cm across, cup-shaped, yellowish - buff with a paler inner surface.  The outer surface is similar but can be darker with a scurfy texture that darkens towards the base.
This is an occasional fungus.

Below are some photographs.

Perspective showing the size 
Showing young